Fox Hunting Life with Horse and Hound

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tally ho.neil amatt.kleckThe "Tally Ho" / Nancy Kleck photo

The next time you view old Reynard or that sneaky coyote slipping away from covert, you may be tempted to call out “Tally Ho.” There are occasions in the hunting field when it is appropriate to yell this call out loudly-and-clearly, but with our modern methods it is more likely that the huntsman will be informed by a whipper-in with a quick call over the hunt radio that the quarry has broken cover.

The quiet approach will be less disturbing to the hounds but it will not stir the adrenaline like the old-fashioned blood-curdling call of Tally Ho, yelled out loud at the top of your voice! Such an old-school call in the hunting field causes the mounted field to take in that extra hole in their girth, to cease “coffee housing” with their companions, and for the horses’ ears to prick forward in anticipation of exciting action to come.

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Comments   

# Steven Price 2019-02-26 09:01
Tally-ho is also a term NASA astronauts use in audio transmissions to signify sightings of other spacecraft, space stations, and unidentified objects.
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# John Anderson 2019-02-26 12:44
My understanding is that the term comes from stag hunting in France, what the huntsman calls out when the stag leaps from cover and takes off. The Middle French "Taille haut" in Modern French is "Il est haute," literally "He is up." It may very well have been used in battle as well. There was a considerable amount of hunting calls and horn work between the British and Colonials during the American Revolution.
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