Fox Hunting Life with Horse and Hound

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nodh.klmWhat are you missing out on by cancelled events, and how are your horses helping to keep you occupied now that we are engaged in the newly-minted but necessary practise of social distancing? If you have such a story, share it with Foxhunting Life.

Over the next couple of months I was scheduled for book talks and signings at five libraries and at one of the oldest country clubs in the U.S. Of course, that schedule has gone by the boards along with your own schedules.

I have been publishing Foxhunting Life from my home office from the start, and can certainly continue to do so. Since publication of my new book, Blind Bombing: How Microwave Radar Brought the Allies to D-Day and Victory in Europe, just last December, I have also been giving talks and signing books at museums, libraries, bookstores, and cultural centers. I spoke to a large, knowledgeable, and engaged audience in Georgia at the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force with a ninety-six year old B-17 WWII pilot sitting in the front row. That was a thrill!

I do believe strongly in the programs recently instituted by governments, both national and local. It all has to do with slowing down the rate of infections from an exponential rise with which our health infrastructure is unable to cope, to a level and hopefully soon a diminishing rate with which we can cope. Certainly these are uncharted waters for all living Americans and affecting everyone equally.

So in the meantime, although I won’t be seeing you at any talks or book signing venues for a while, please know that Blind Bombing: How Microwave Radar Brought the Allies to D-Day is available from:

• The University of Nebraska Press at a forty percent discount using code 6AF19;
• Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other online sellers and bookstores;
me, with the option to specify to whom the book shall be inscribed;
• or if you don’t care to purchase on a website, send me an email or call.

Blind Bombing has received highly favorable notices, among them a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer/historian, editor of the American Aviation Historical Society, a senior foreign service officer, and editor of an Ivy League magazine. Click to see what they say.

To those who have read Blind Bombing or plan to: if you enjoy the book, please do me a huge favor by giving it a rating and a short review—even just two sentences—on Amazon, Good Reads, or Barnes and Noble. Those reviews are important, and I will be immensely grateful to you.

Finally, I wish all who read Foxhunting Life—from new subscribers to all the old faithfuls and longtime friends—good health and a safe passage through this tunnel of uncertainty.

Posted March 20, 2020

Comments   

# Guest 2020-06-08 14:22
Great book..but you ,missed one of the lead characters who was in the thick of all of it. He was off on his sailboat when everyone else was writing up their activities.His name is Herb Weiss, a 1940 MIT grad, still alive and well and skippering his boat at almost 102 yrs. he was at Tuxedo park, RadLab, several stints in England, aboard planes w/searchlights on sub chase mission, etc etc, and tells me he knows just about everyone in the book except your uncle and Winston Chiurchill.. He'd love to talk with you. If you'll email me your phone number I'll pass out on to him ., You two should surely talk. I'm Wallace Feldman, [email protected] Thanks.
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