Fox Hunting Life with Horse and Hound

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Here you will find reviews of, selections from, and commentaries concerning books, many of which don't even appear on Amazon's radar. But what goldmines for the literate foxhunter!

Biography of a Sportsman, II

thumb_sherman_haight_painting

Most foxhunters know Sherman Haight by reputation, but it’s our guess that few know about his new memoir. That’s because it was written primarily for friends and family, but FOXHUNTING LIFE believes it deserves to be relished by a wider audience.

The Kill: Take This One to the Beach

KillJustCover_smJune 29, 2010
"A shot exploded in the hushed twilight and grumbled through fog in the hollows."

So begins The Kill, Jan Neuharth’s third mystery novel set in the famed foxhunting country of Middleburg, Virginia. All the familiar landmarks are there: The Coach Stop, Books and Crannies, Middleburg Tack Exchange, The Upper Crust. You want to keep clear of Goose Creek and the Foxcroft Road, though. Bad things happen there.

Foxhunt

FHL takes pleasure in publishing the winning entry in the United States Pony Club annual Hildegard Neill Ritchie Joys of Foxhunting Writing Contest for 2010. As one of the contest judges, I was impressed by the powerful imagery produced by this young author's creative description of wind, trees, and earth from the horse's perspective.

In the coming weeks FHL will publish more worthy top-placing efforts by foxhunting Pony Clubbers in the contest.

Blair's Memoir: An Astonishing Claim

In an astounding revelation, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair claims to have deliberately sabotaged the Hunting Act of 2004 so that foxhunting would continue.

In his newly published memoir A Journey (Random House), Blair says that the hunting ban was "one of the domestic legislative measures I most regret." He claims to have (1) engineered sufficient loopholes in the Act so that hunting could continue and (2) instructed his Home Office minister to steer the police away from enforcing the law.